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Academic Guidance Academic Guidance - Academic guidance for those pursuing a college degree... what college? Grad school? PhD help?


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February 28th, 2016, 09:45 AM   #1
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Jobs in mathematics

Hey everyone.

I'm still in the baby steps of math, but I really do enjoy it. I'm currently a freshman working on earning a mechanical engineering degree. But I often ponder what it would be like if I double majored in Physics and Applied Mathematics. Would I struggle finding a job after college?

I'm very passionate about space and aeronautics so I would love to work in those fields down the road.


I hope everyone is enjoying their weekend.
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February 28th, 2016, 10:09 AM   #2
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I'm actually in my final year of a degree in applied maths\ physics (theoretical physics). It's a very hard degree but very interesting. As long as you have a good result at the end of the degree, there is no reason you can't be considered for most jobs which consider plain applied maths or plain physics students as well as PhD type work.

Hope this helps
Chris
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Last edited by skipjack; February 28th, 2016 at 06:31 PM.
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February 28th, 2016, 04:02 PM   #3
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I am senior studying Robotics/Mechatronics Engineering, and I too have a keen interest in Mathematics (ultimately pure math, but I don't think I'll get the opportunity).

All I can say is that it's great you are thinking about it at this stage, and I would encourage you to pursue math further .

As for finding jobs, I wouldn't worry about it at all, especially if you've combined a math double with engineering. Employers will see you as a more qualified and mature candidate with skills and intellectual qualities others don't have.

All the best!

Last edited by skipjack; February 28th, 2016 at 06:33 PM.
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February 28th, 2016, 05:05 PM   #4
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Be prepared to work a lot harder on a joint maths based degree. In my experience its more calculation heavy and mentally taxing than other degrees. That's not to say that other degrees are easier than maths. But maths requires a very different kind of focus since its less about knowing the lecture notes and more about being adaptable and flexible with the way you apply your ideas.
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February 28th, 2016, 05:11 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by chris747 View Post
But maths requires a very different kind of focus since its less about knowing the lecture notes and more about being adaptable and flexible with the way you apply your ideas.
That's why we (or maybe just me) love it!

I just noticed that I can't edit my past posts? I'm doing double of app. math along with eng.

Last edited by skipjack; February 28th, 2016 at 06:34 PM.
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February 29th, 2016, 12:37 AM   #6
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That's why we (or maybe just me) love it!

I just noticed that I can't edit my past posts? I'm doing double of app. math along with eng.
Well, that's also my reason why I love math. It's just like playing a game. Whenever we meet a dead-end, we can try to solve it using different approach,
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February 29th, 2016, 06:40 AM   #7
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Mechanical engineering will earn you much more initially, and your income will be far more stable than physics and maths... but hey, at the end of the day, if you're passionate about the subject, you can definitely excel in it. It's hard to find a decent job with just a bachelor's degree in physics+maths, but if you go on to a research postgraduate degree, you can probably get a good job.

BTW, does your uni offer aerospace engineering? If so, it sounds like a good idea for you.

Last edited by 123qwerty; February 29th, 2016 at 06:59 AM.
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February 29th, 2016, 01:06 PM   #8
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BTW, does your uni offer aerospace engineering? If so, it sounds like a good idea for you.
I agree with qwerty, you'd be able to kill two birds with one stone so to speak as aerospace will have a larger physics component (not that there's no physics in mechanical though).

Then maybe take some electives in math, or minor in math.
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February 29th, 2016, 01:27 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 123qwerty View Post
Mechanical engineering will earn you much more initially, and your income will be far more stable than physics and maths... but hey, at the end of the day, if you're passionate about the subject, you can definitely excel in it. It's hard to find a decent job with just a bachelor's degree in physics+maths, but if you go on to a research postgraduate degree, you can probably get a good job.

BTW, does your uni offer aerospace engineering? If so, it sounds like a good idea for you.
I appreciate the response! Unfortunately, my school does not offer Aerospace Engineering which is a huge let down.
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February 29th, 2016, 01:27 PM   #10
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I agree with qwerty, you'd be able to kill two birds with one stone so to speak as aerospace will have a larger physics component (not that there's no physics in mechanical though).

Then maybe take some electives in math, or minor in math.
No matter what happens I'd love to minor in mathematics. Thanks for your responses!
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