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May 20th, 2011, 08:19 AM   #1
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Could you help me understand one sentence about polynomial?s

The sentence in question is the attachment below in big letters. Please explain to me, what kind of polynomials are members of this set P? For example, are polynomials x^3 + x/2 and x^3 + x^2 members of the set P?
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May 20th, 2011, 08:48 AM   #2
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Re: Could you help me understand one sentence about polynomi

If H is in P, then H(n) is a polynomial with rational coefficients, such that if n is a natural number, so is H(n).

For example, H(n)=n+n qualifies, but H(n)=n+n does not (e.g. try n=1).
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May 20th, 2011, 12:21 PM   #3
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Re: Could you help me understand one sentence about polynomi

Quote:
Originally Posted by aswoods
If H is in P, then H(n) is a polynomial with rational coefficients, such that if n is a natural number, so is H(n).

For example, H(n)=n+n qualifies, but H(n)=n+n does not (e.g. try n=1).
Thank you very much
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